Energy, Mines and Resources

Mount Nansen

Mount Nansen

A photo of the Mount Nansen mine with an inset map of its location in Yukon.

Mount Nansen is an abandoned former gold and silver mine located 60 km west of the Village of Carmacks and within the Traditional Territory of the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation. It is currently under government care.


Legal notice from PricewaterhouseCoopers on the sale of Mount Nansen


On May 13, 2016, the Supreme Court of Yukon approved a Proposal Solicitation Process with respect to the remaining assets of BYG Natural Resources Inc. and the mine site. PricewaterhouseCoopers Inc., the court-appointed receiver of BYG, was directed to implement the Proposal Solicitation Process.

The Proposal Solicitation Process describes how the receiver will implement the competitive process to seek proposals from qualified parties for the acquisition of the remaining assets of BYG Natural Resources Inc. and the performance of the remediation of the Mine Site.

The competitive process seeks to identify a qualified proponent that, as the purchaser, will enter into an agreement to, among other things, perform the remediation work, which includes the development, approval, and implementation of a remediation plan for the mine site. The agreement will include provisions with respect to the purchaser obtaining all regulatory authorizations necessary to implement the remediation plan, including from the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board, and with respect to payment by the Government of Canada for work done by the purchaser.

For more information on the Proposal Solicitation Process, please visit the receiver's website.


Background


The Mount Nansen Mine is a former gold and silver mine. The property is located 60 km west of the Village of Carmacks and is within the Traditional Territory of the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation.

In 1999, the mine owner, BYG Natural Resources Inc. was unable to meet the requirements of its water licence and, as a result, ceased its mining operations. Immediately after shutdown, BYG appointed a receiver to the site. In July 1999, the receiver abandoned the property. The Government of Canada took control of the site and began implementing care and maintenance operations.

In 2003, with the Devolution Transfer Agreement, the Government of Yukon became responsible for the property and lead the development and implementation of a remediation plan. The financial responsibility for the site continues to reside with the Government of Canada.